A Microscopic Menace: Giardia in Dogs 

Your pet can’t possibly have parasites – after all you haven’t seen anything in their stool. Right? 

Well, if you think that you can see all pet parasites with your naked eye, you would be mistaken. There are actually quite a few intestinal parasites that you can’t see without the aid of a microscope. At Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital one of the more common parasites that we diagnose is Giardia in dogs, and it is definitely one that you won’t be seeing without fecal testing

The Gist of Giardia

Unlike the traditional worm that you might think of when the phrase “intestinal parasite” is used, Giardia is a single-celled parasite that calls the intestinal tract its home.

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Digging Doggie: How to Stop Your Dog from Digging 

Dogs and digging kind of go hand-in-hand. After all, their wild predecessors required good digging skills to pull up roots and other things they can eat. This necessary skill is not always appreciated when it comes to your dug up flower bed, however! Since your dog has the natural instinct to dig, it may begin in puppyhood and continue throughout their adult life, if not redirected. 

If you have a digging doggie, the team at Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital is sympathetic. We are here with some pointers on how to stop your dog from digging and improve their great behavior.

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Feral Cats May Be Ubiquitous, but Do They Need Our Help? 

Alley ways, country lanes, suburban streets, and urban boulevards all have something in common: they are thoroughfares for feral cats. 

The differences between feral cats and the ones we live with are striking. They are extremely skittish and fearful of humans, but instead of earning their reputations as public nuisances, they are at risk of serious illness or injury. As you might expect, there are lots of ways we can help feral cats, and the results can be deeply satisfying.

Strange Paw Prints

If you’ve seen a cat around your neighborhood, but don’t know who they belong to, they may be completely on their own. But that doesn’t mean they are necessarily alone. In fact, most feral cats live in colonies. 

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All About Rabies: Mythbuster Edition

The rabies virus affects the central nervous system that specifically affects mammals. Although rabies is a preventable disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates it kills 59,000 people each year worldwide. The most common cause of transmission? Dogs.

In honor of World Rabies Day, September 28, the team at Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital wants to make sure our readers understand the risk of rabies and how simple it can be to prevent this deadly disease.

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Keeping Pets Safe From Snakes at Home

A white dog tentatively approaches a rattlesnake coiled on a tree stump in a backyard.

Californians are fairly well-versed at looking out for snakes while enjoying our state’s open spaces – especially while hiking or camping with our pets. Even though we know we share a close proximity (sometimes too close!) to various types of wildlife, it’s often a surprise to run into snakes in our own backyards. Fortunately, most snakes don’t pose a threat, but keeping pets safe from snakes remains a top priority this summer.

Equal Access

Snakes are important members of California’s ecosystem. Responsible for major pest-control, snakes deserve their place in the food chain. They reduce nuisance populations of rodents, insects, lizards, and amphibians. By virtue of their very healthy appetites, snakes can even minimize the spread of disease to humans via rodents. 

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Beating Heatstroke in Pets

Bulldog on grass

Summer may be winding down, but in our neck of the woods the heat is far from over. High temperatures will continue for weeks, if not months, and keeping our pets (and ourselves) protected from heat-related dangers should remain a top priority.

Because pets don’t regulate their internal temperature as efficiently as humans (think panting compared to sweating), heatstroke is a serious concern during the summer months. Your Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital team wants you to be able to spot the signs of heatstroke in pets, know how to help your pet, and, most importantly, prevent the condition in the first place.

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posted in:  For The Dogs  |  Pet Safety  |  The Great Outdoors

Keep Your Dog Safe at the Beach

Dog with tennis ball in mouth playing in ocean

Who doesn’t love a trip to the coast? It’s a wonderful way for us to escape the summer heat or winter blahs and is, of course, best shared with our furry four-legged family members. But, are there specific things to know to keep your dog safe at the beach? 

Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital is your partner in pet health and safety, so join us as we explore this question. 

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Intestinal Parasites in Pets: Protecting Our Furry Loved Ones

When we think of parasites and pets, fleas, ticks, and heartworm usually come to mind. Indeed, these organisms are the cause of much misery for both animals and people, and it makes sense to keep our pets protected year-round with the use of prescription parasite preventive medications.

Intestinal parasites in pets are also an important cause of disease. Besides making pets sick, many of these organisms can be passed to people. Keeping your family and pets safe requires routine testing and preventive measures, and the team at Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital can show you how.

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When It Comes to Wildlife, Keep an Eye on Pet Safety

It can be thrilling to catch a glimpse of a wild animal, but unless you are at a safe distance their actions can be highly unpredictable and incredibly dangerous.

Raccoons, skunks, foxes, porcupines, and opossums are certainly not rarities, but neither are local sightings of rattlesnakes, bears, coyotes, cougars, and various birds of prey.

The bottom line is that when pet safety remains a top priority, we can all move closer toward peaceful (or at least uneventful) co-existence.

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The Pros and Cons of Retractable Leashes

When it comes to pet care products, dog owners know there’s no end to the available products on the market, and leashes are no different. Dog owners can choose retractable leashes or traditional leather or nylon leashes that come in a wide variety of lengths, colors, and patterns.

Retractable leashes have been growing in popularity in recent years, but they can put pets and people at serious risk of injury, trauma, or worse. The team at Rocklin Ranch Veterinary Hospital wants to shed some light on this controversial issue so our readers can make an informed decision when it comes to walking their four-legged best friends.

Retractable Leashes 101

Retractable leashes are essentially thin cords that retract into a large, plastic handle. The cord is attached to a spring-loaded mechanism inside the handle, and a button on the outside allows the walker to control how far the leash can extend at any given time.

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